Divorce Dedicated to Providing Personalized Attention to Every Client

Filing for Divorce in Chesterfield

Serving Families Throughout St. Louiswoman getting divorced in Chesterfield

At Galmiche Law Firm, P.C., we have helped countless individuals navigate this intimidating and emotional process and secure favorable terms of their divorce. Our firm has 35 years of collective family law legal experience. Our attorneys offer thoughtful representation and are well-versed in what needs to be done to secure the best possible results both in and outside the courtroom.

This is a difficult time.
Retain proven counsel who is prepared to diligently safeguard your future.
We serve throughout Chesterfield and St. Louis.

Uncontested Divorce vs. Contested Divorce in Missouri

We're seeing more and more couples willing to put aside their differences and end their marriage in the most amicable and cost-effective way possible—by filing for an uncontested divorce. In an uncontested divorce, both parties must agree on the terms of their divorce. That means spouses must come to an understanding of various elements like property division, child custody, and so forth.

When spouses cannot come to an agreement on the terms of their divorce, the divorce is considered contested. In these cases, spouses must enter litigation and, with the help of legal counsel, present their arguments to a judge.

In both circumstances, legal counsel can help establish favorable terms for:

No one enters a marriage expecting it to one day end in divorce, but when marriages do end, it is critical that both spouses retain experienced legal counsel to see them through the process. It is critical that both parties' rights and interests are recognized and respected during the divorce procedure and that the court is made fully aware of factors that could affect these individuals' lives post-marriage.

No Fault Divorce in Missouri

The grounds for divorce in Missouri don’t require either spouse to prove a fault in the other spouse in order to justify the divorce. Instead, a couple can file for no-fault divorce. The ground for a no-fault divorce is that the marriage is “irretrievably broken” and can’t be repaired. The court must see that this is true. If the court decides that there is hope for the marriage to be repaired, then it might grant a legal separation instead.

While a spouse does not have to prove a fault in the other spouse to get a divorce, the courts might use fault-based factors when determining matters such as support or property division.

To learn more about filing for divorce in Missouri, don’t hesitate to contact our firm!

What is the Divorce Process Like in Missouri?

The process of divorce begins by filing a document that can be referred to as a complaint or petition. A copy of it will be served to your spouse, which can be done by the sheriff’s office or a process server. Your spouse will have some options as to how he or she can reply to the complaint, which can dictate the path that your divorce case takes from that point forward. For example, if the divorce is contested and you and your spouse cannot work together to negotiate a settlement, your case will have to go through litigation, which will likely result in formal court hearings.

What if I Cannot Find my Spouse During a Divorce?

If you are unsure of the whereabouts of your spouse, you will still be able to get a divorce, though it will take more time since you will have to go through a few extra steps to make it happen. First, you will have to attempt to notify your spouse that you have filed for divorce. Without knowing where he or she is, you will have to check telephone listings in the area where your spouse is last known to have lived, ask friends and family if they know of his or her whereabouts, check with the post office for a forwarding address, or check state records for driver’s license or vehicle registration. If none of these efforts yield any results, you may be able to go through a procedure known as service by publication, which will require you to obtain the court’s permission to publish a notice of the divorce in a newspaper.

Divorce Modification

Life is ever-changing, ever-evolving and, to accommodate these changes, the family courts allow for post-divorce modifications as to child custody, child support and in some cases maintenance. If your divorce agreement no longer works for you or is no longer in the best interest of your children, you may be able to request a modification of the terms of your divorce. However, generally, you cannot modify property or debt division, unless there was fraud involved or some very usual circumstance.

If your former spouse and you are on the same page and can agree to modify the terms of your divorce agreement, this will simplify matters considerably. You must still submit the appropriate Motion and Consent Modification Judgment in writing to the court for the Judge to enter the Consent Judgment, to ensure it is enforceable. In some cases, a hearing may be necessary to confirm that both parties agreed to the new terms of their divorce decree.

Contested Motion for Modification

A party may proceed with filing with the Court a motion to modify the terms of their divorce decree, At a contested trial,as the party who is pursuing the modification, you must present evidence that shows there was a substantial and continuing change in circumstances, which warrant the modification.

For example, if you involuntarily lost your job, a judge may see this as a substantial and continuing change in circumstances that warrant a reduction of your spousal or child support payments. If you are requesting a modification of your child custody agreement, you should prove that there was a substantial and continuing change in circumstances and that the modification serves the best interests of the children.

Enforcing the Divorce Decree

If your former spouse refuses to comply with the divorce decree, you can file a motion for contempt and seek to enforce its terms. You may pursue a Motion to Modify along with the Motion for Contempt at the same time. In some cases, a judge might grant a modification of the terms in your divorce decree if your former spouse fails to comply with it. For example, if your ex-spouse does not drop off the children on time to you on a regular basis or otherwise tries to prevent you from spending time with your children, you can request the court to modify the custody arrangement.

Call a St. Louis Divorce Law Firm at (636) 552-4841 Today

At Galmiche Law Firm, P.C., we are well-versed in both contested and uncontested divorce procedures. No matter which route you need to take to dissolve your marriage, you can count on us to provide engaged, responsive, and assertive representation that has your long-term well-being in mind. We are ready to hear your story, assess your options, and devise a legal strategy that will help ensure that your divorce is completed as swiftly and efficiently as possible. To get started, contact us for a free, in-person consultation.

Related Reading

Ready to discuss your options? Contact a St. Louis attorney at Galmiche Law Firm, P.C.

Why Choose Galmiche Law Firm?

See What Sets Our Firm Apart
  • 35 Years of Combined Experience in Family Law & Divorce Matters
  • Award-Winning Attorneys Fighting for You
  • Weekend and Evening Appointments Available Upon Request
  • Complimentary & Confidential Initial Consultations
  • Honest Guidance & Counsel Backed by Years of Experience
  • Attentive, One-On-One Legal Services

Contact Us Today!

Schedule your free, phone consultation to get started.
  • Please enter your first name.
  • Please enter your last name.
  • Please enter your phone number.
    This isn't a valid phone number.
  • Please enter your email address.
    This isn't a valid email address.
  • Please make a selection.
  • Please make a selection.
  • Please enter a message.
    • Please make a selection.